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Myths vs Facts

Opponent myth

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The only way to ensure that Encinitas is protected from the Sacramento push to over-densify coastal cities is to pass the statewide constitutional amendment that will restore Local Control back to each city.

Fact

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The constitutional amendment initiative approach has failed once and is flawed. There are several ways to reform state housing laws and Joy is pursuing all of them. Due to her knowledge of eco-districts, sustainable design, and understanding of land use policies Joy is to target housing at the state level. She is working to reform state housing laws and increase funding for affordable housing through the CA League of Cities (450+ cities statewide) and is focused on raising the vote threshold in the Legislature to 2/3 for housing and land use bills, requiring the Legislative Analyst’s Office to analyze the effects of housing legislation, and changing the standard for what is considered a matter of statewide concern.

Opponent myth

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Councilmember Lyndes does not support Local Control of zoning issues.

Fact 

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On the contrary, Joy supports local decision making for housing. She supports Objective Standards for land use and housing, defining local standards for setbacks, building materials, drainage, existing vegetation, form and mass. These Standards ensure that development blends and integrates with our local setting and context, and helps to preserve our unique character.

Opponent myth

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Our opponent is the only District 3 candidate who supports open space preservation and procurement.

Fact 

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Joy not only supports the preservation of open space, she co-wrote the 2022 Open Space resolution identifying 4 key strategies for improving our Encinitas open spaces. This resolution drives increased funding for open space stewardship, the evaluation of the multi-species habitat conservation sub area plan, discussion with non-profit partners about expansion of open space and access to state level funding for open space procurement and development. Notably, the city has an active Park Development fund, to which developers contribute, which has and will continue to invest in open space throughout the city.

Opponent myth

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We need more affordable housing, but it should not precede upgrades in infrastructure. Doesn’t the developer have an obligation (at least typically) to improve infrastructure?

Fact 

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Developers are required by the City to address infrastructure improvements associated with their developments.  The infrastructure improvements vary by project, location and needs.

Opponent myth

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Encinitas is becoming a crowded coastal city, which is in contrast to the reputation we had as a quiet beach town.

Fact 

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The growth rate of the Encinitas population was less than 0.7%/yr over the last 10 years, and only 0.2%/yr over the last 3 years, representing an absolute increase of only around 420 people/yr. This is about half the growth rate for Carlsbad for example and is consistent with growth rates for other coastal cities. The population in the age group 18-65 has actually declined over this period, whereas the population over 65 has increased more rapidly than other age groups, reflecting the challenges of housing affordability for the working age population in Encinitas.

Opponent myth

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I moved to Encinitas in 2014.

Fact 

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My family has lived in San Diego since 2008, first in the city of San Diego and then relocated to Encinitas in 2012.

Opponent myth

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Joy’s campaign is financially supported by developers.

Fact 

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Joy has not received one single campaign contribution from a developer.